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IMAGE CREDIT: My Space Sim Seat by Gabriel L. Marginean. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

 

The last few years I have crowdsourced my fiction reading and have found people in my network to be an excellent aggregated recommendation service. Somehow Marieke Guy managed to read a book a week during 2016. How?! I am in awe. And some of my friends online get through a huge number of non-fiction books. I’m very jealous of that, I just can’t concentrate enough. But I do always have a book on the go and I recently blogged about rediscovering feminism, much of which was books and films.

My creeping obsession of 2016 has been space-based sci-fi.

Escapism is much needed given the state of the world. Brexit and Trump were not things I imagined or welcomed. But there’s more to it than that. I have been drawn to grand plans, to huge ambitions, to sketches of life in the far-future. I’m not one for space battles and intergalactic war. If I’m honest, Star Wars leaves me a bit cold. The books and films I’ve enjoyed nearly all include some daily life: the living arrangements, the food, the hobbies, the space ships and planet-ports and the science that becomes everyday tools and technology. So many things I haven’t seen and read yet, this is only a partial snapshot of the genre, but everything I’m about to mention has nourished me this year.

So to usher in 2017, I present to you some highlighted Films (F) and Books (B) imagining the future, in space …

Interstellar (F). Liked this, especially the end, the vision of how people might live. (Not to be confused with Gravity, which I confused this with in an earlier post!)

The Martian (F). Loved the science, and the potatoes-with-ketchup, the extent of the ambition.

Mars (TV), National Geographic. Am a bit behind on this, so no spoilers, but enjoying it very much. Again, the ambition and the science.

A recommendation led me to The Book of Strange New Things (B) by Michel Faber. I didn’t expect it to be science fiction so it felt like a genre-surprise. (Recommendation from Morag Eyrie or Jackie Carter??)

My biggest discovery was Anne Leckie, the Imperial Radch Trilogy (B). I think I found that myself. Wow, wow, wow! Far future, exploring life in space, huge vistas of history, artificial intelligence, culture and politics.

That led me back to Anne McCaffrey, the Ship Who Sang (B): older but really good, and clearly a big influence on Leckie. Speculative fiction about AI, small stories in a huge world. I have read some Ursula Le Guin but owe her a revisit I think.

Then I accidentally found The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet (B) by Becky Chambers. Powerful, closely painted world, feels a bit McCaffrey, a bit Leckie. Just about to start her second book “A Closed and Common Orbit”. She self-published the first one and if you like the idea of a spaceworld a bit Dark Star, a bit Red Dwarf, space ships with the wires showing and people just jobbing it, try it.

My final mention goes to Seveneves (B) by Neal Stephenson (Recommended by Paul Walk or Mark Power or Ian Dolphin?). The hugeness of it, and the engineering, the science, and the effect of space on human culture. I hear there is a film being made, and I will be crossing my fingers they do a good job of it.

Many of these books gave me great dreams, but Seveneves and the Imperial Radch Triology painted the most enduring pictures in my mind.

Let’s Boldly Go into 2017. Cheers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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