Over the last year I have been exploring the new wave of feminism, through light entertainment, novels and manifestos. It’s happened by accident really, just jumping one book or website to the next.

The obvious recent books that I haven’t read (yet?): Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg, BossyPants by Tina Fey. There are some themes I haven’t really explored yet. This is a very anglocentric, white, middle class, hetero, able-bodied, born-female list. I know it’s only a tiny corner of women’s experience. See the end of this post for what this slice of feminism means to me.

Enough disclaimers. Let me tell you what I have been reading/ skimming/ admiring. Consider this a scrapbook of my recent aventures in feminism.

Amy Poehler. I read “Yes Please“. Somehow her feminism shines through. She’s body-positive, she likes men, she’s worked incredibly hard at being good at what she does, collaborated a lot, and she’s funny. I then found her Smart Girls initiative. Fantastic stuff here.

Other impressive campaign-based approaches are Pink Stinks, and of course Everyday Sexism.

On a more serious note, the Counting Dead Women project is important testimony to the unspoken facts about the overwhelming pattern of violence in our society.

The Natural Way of Things” is a novel by Charlotte Wood, also exploring female vulnerability and sexual violence. In a funny kind of way it reminded me of a very different novel, “The Vegetarian” by Han Kang. Difficult to explain why, but they shared a dreamy yet visceral quality. Also see the less recent Charlotte Roche’s “Wetlands“, with its uncomfortably frank physicality.

Dietland” by Sarai Walker is a great fiction read, an imaginative tour of contemporary western feminism. Flavours of Fight Club. I recommend it.

I’d still like to find more fiction about being in a woman’s body: boobs, pubic hair, periods, sex, childbirth, breastfeeding. But with humour and self-acceptance. Recommendations very welcome.

Amy Schumer is my other American comedian crush, alongside Poehler. She’s so … sassy. And if you haven’t seen her sketch The Last F*ckable Day, watch it. It’s about Hollywood double standards but she’s really rocking that theme. I love that these glamorous women are standing together to resist the stupid questions that wouldn’t be asked of men. Along the same lines, a quick mention for Lena Dunham who I wish I could get into but perhaps she’s a generation a bit younger than me. Glad she does her thing though!

I enjoyed My Mad Fat Diary on Channel 4. Based in my era, gosh I wish I’d been able to watch that when I was that age. But my real spokesperson, my experience growing up as a mouthy feminist socialist in the Midlands, is Caitlin Moran. Her “How to be a Woman” is a wonderful wonderful book.

Now: Rebecca Solnit’s “Men Explain Things To Me” is clearly important. I haven’t read the whole of it but the concept of mansplaining has been a significant one for me.

That led me to my latest discovery, “Feminist Fight Club” by Jessica Bennett. Just finished this, it’s a tactics playbook for dealing with the more subtle dynamics of the workplace. Mansplaining, and bropriation. See this great infographic for an idea of what the book explores.

A final mention for the very wonderful Man who has it all.

manwho

More where that comes from: @manwhohasitall .

My refreshed feminism

As I acknowledged above, I absolutely do not claim that this is the way to frame feminism for other women. But I’ve found my recent explorations to be strangely fortifying. I’m married to a wonderful man who breaks most stereotypes: he cooks, cleans and nurtures our two boys. I chose well ;-). I work full time in a well-paid job, and I work with many powerful women and some fantastic feminist men. I live a life of privilege. I’m not claiming victim status. But I want to inhabit my female body, my woman’s life, as fully as I can, and in a very personal way, that’s my feminism right now.